Manningtree (Slight Return)

001

We came back to the North House Gallery in Manningtree to see Fin · River · Swift, a new exhibition by Julian Meredith. This piece is called Elmigration, a large woodcut measuring 3 metres by 1 metre, printed from a single plank of elm wood.

002

Julian Meredith’s previous exhibition here five years ago was our introduction to this beautiful gallery. There were huge prints suspended from the ceiling like banners, displayed alongside the woodblocks they were printed from. This time the prints are exhibited more conventionally, in frames, but they still manage to defy convention.

Here’s a nice video in which he describes his working methods, printing without a printing press.

003

004

005

006

007
North House Gallery

008

Next stop was the Mistley Thorn, a historic pub with a great menu, where we had lunch with a group of historic car enthusiasts and talked cruise control, proximity regulators and auto dip headlights!

009

010

The Mistley Thorn

011

In Furze Hill Woods we discovered a great collection of fine old oak trees.

012

013

014

And best of all we finally got to meet Old Knobbley.

015

This wonderful 800 year old oak tree, still vigorous, full of leaf and bursting with acorns, welcomed us with open arms. Lovely to be embraced by such longevity. Click on the image above for a closer look.

016

017

018

019

020

I was going to call this photo Man in Tree in Manningtree but then remembered we were in Mistley.

021

022

Old Knobbley

023

Then we went over to Wrabness and looked for signs of Grayson Perry and Julie’s House.

025

024

026

Down a lane beside the railway station, beneath a panoramic cloudscape, to a glittering folly.

027

028

It’s not a pretty sight.

029

Grayson Perry’s A House For Essex, also known as Julie’s House, is brassy and blingy and just a little bit folksy, like William Morris and Ian Dury meet the Brothers Grimm at The Great British Bake Off.

030

031

032

The house was designed by Grayson Perry as a tribute to his fictional hero Julie, a struggling single mother, divorced then later remarried, whose second husband built it as a Taj Mahal in her memory.

033

034

But really it was commissioned by Living Architecture, an organisation created by Alain de Botton to encourage interest in modern architecture. It is just one of their many unique holiday homes.

Click above to see inside.

036

Architect Charles Holland and artist Grayson Perry, dressed as Julie.

035

A House For Essex

037

Afterwards we walked down to the beach to clear our heads.

038

039

040

041

042

042a

043

044

045

046

047

048

049

Wrabness

050

052

051

053

Wrabness

Frames of reference
This entry was posted in Art, Buildings, Ceramics, Places, Pubs, Trees, Video, Walks and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Manningtree (Slight Return)

  1. Pingback: Manningtree | Frames of Reference

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.