All Blues

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Seen on the way to the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow, thanks to God’s Own Junkyard, a parade of shops on Blackhorse Lane feels the William Morris effect, the spirit of regeneration brought to the area by the museum’s own renovation, with maybe a few ripples of Olympic legacy.

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The car park by the museum was hosting a festival for the Hindu temple across the street, sponsored by Lebara and their blue balloons were everywhere. Even this lop eared rabbit had the blues.

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We’d been attracted to the William Morris Gallery by a notice on their website for an exhibition by Lucille Junkere, a textile artist in residence exploring the use of indigo dye. She titled it All Blues, after a piece of music by Miles Davis from his Kind of Blue album. It reminded me of another homage to Miles Davis that I’d been briefly involved with called Kind of Red at the Timothy Taylor Gallery.

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But there was no All Blues exhibition, I must have misunderstood, and the only reference to indigo was this display in the museum’s permanent collection which we’d seen earlier.

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There was a display case with three sculptures by Lizzie Hughes, another artist in residence. Ghost of a Ghost is a trio of Rorschach style ink blots rendered as steel hinges formally presented on plinths.

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There was a large photograph by Jeremy Deller showing an image of William Morris on one of the prehistoric standing stones at Avebury. Another ghostly emanation or Photoshopped shapeshifter?

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There were cushions in the shop with floral William Morris designs that brought to mind the coronal patterns of Fanny Shorter, but she wasn’t there either.

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Outside there was more symmetry with neatly balanced flower beds but there were relaxed areas too.

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Back out on the street the festivities continued as devotees of Ganesh hauled his heavy juggernaut in a slow, colourful procession. And the colours caught in the trees were all blues.

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At home, much as I love Miles Davis, I put on an alternative version. Today it’s my favourite homage.

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Kahil El’Zabar, Mbira & David Murray, Tenor Saxophone : All Blues

Frames of reference
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6 Responses to All Blues

  1. Hank Frankel says:

    Given your loves, I thought I was going to listen to something perhaps originating from Kansas City but instead I got William Morris. However, he is good on the eyes. So all is well in KC.

  2. Lucille says:

    So sorry you didn’t find what what you were looking for when you visited the gallery, although a most inspired trip nevertheless. The notice on the gallery website was an announcement confirming me as this years artist in residence. The residency has started already with research in the library and indigo workshops. I am currently working on my own indigo textile samples which will be on display at the gallery under the title All Blues of course from April 2015. Why don’t you send me a message so that I can invite you to the private view next year for your enthusiasm and trouble. As well as my work there will of course be music and you know exactly which album will be playing.

    • Hello Lucille, I’m sorry we missed you the first time. The William Morris Gallery looks like a great place to have a residency. Good luck! I hope we see you next year. Thanks for the invitation, it’s kind of you, it’s Kind of Blue!

  3. Lucille says:

    LOL (at the word play) No problem at all. It’s a lovely place for a residency, most inspiring. I will be in touch again in the new year to extend an invite to the private view featuring my textile samples in all shades of indigo ” all shades, all hues, all blues”. I’m testing your Davis knowledge now!
    Best wishes Lucille

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